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Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

316                                                                      RAPID POPULATIOr-
literate farmers. They may recognize that even in cold cost-b education often pays off better than alternative investments.
PROGRESS AND PROBLEMS IN EXPANDING EDUCA'
The educational progress in developing countries over the las; has been truly impressive. As shown in Table 1, enrollments in s higher education in these countries more than doubled during tl increased by a further two thirds during the first half of the 196 rapid growth was in Africa, where enrollments, including primal trebled in the 15-year period 1950-1965. In some countries educ opments have been spectacular. Venezuela, for example, cut its
TABLE 1
Enrollment at Three Educational Levels in Developing Regions: 1950, 1960, and 1965
Pei
1950     1960      1965      1951 (millions)
AFRICA
1st level (primary)                                        8.5        18.9       25.9         K
2nd level (secondary)                                   0.7          2.1         3.6         11
3rd level (higher)                                          0.1          0.2         0.3         1(
All three levels                                        9.3        21.2       29.9         i:
LATIN AMERICA
1st level (primary)                                      15.4        27.0       34.7           '
2nd level (secondary)                                  1.7         3.9         6.7        li
3rd level (higher)                                          0.3         0.6         0.9         1C
All three levels                                      17.4       31.4       42.3            ASIAa
1st level (primary)                                      42.1        74.6     104.1           '
2nd level (secondary)                                   5.4        12.2       19.7         K
3rd level (higher)                                          0.6          1.4         2.6         1;
All three levels                                      48.1        88.2     126.4           i
TOTAL: LESS DEVELOPED REGIONS
1st level (primary)                                      66.0      120.5     164.7           *
2nd level (secondary)                                   7.9       18.2       30.0         12
3rd level (higher)                                          1.0         2.2         3.8         i:
All three levels                                      74.8      140.9     198.6           l. 46, No. 2, 1968. pp. 237-252.